Thursday, November 2, 2017

Sweater to Cardigan--At Last

This is a project I've had on the back burner of my mind for eons now it seems--turning a sweater into a cardigan.
I got this brown, soft, heavenly sweater at a clothes swap.  I've certainly worn it, but always wished it was a cardigan instead of a sweater.

I like that the top of my dress is still visible when I layer with a cardy rather than pull on a sweater.  I find it easier to maintain an ideal temperature in a cardigan, too.
After pouring over some tutorials online I decided to try a new commercial sewing product--HeatNBond--for my sweater project.  HeatNBond is sort of like double sided tape and fusible interfacing combined.  It made making the new center hems a snap.
It is impossible for me to refrain from calling things like this cheating, but...  Matt was quick to point out that its not like I grew the cotton and wove the fabric either so why not just use all the sewing tools at my disposal.  He offers such a reasonably balanced perspective when I'm getting all hung up on my relationship to the modern world.

I cut down the center front of the sweater and then made a simple folded hem using the HeatNBond to give each side a smooth, finished edge.  I then topstiched with this really cute rainbow variegated thread.  ...Which turned out basically invisible in the cozy thickness of the material, but oh well.
I considered adding a button or a hook and eye, but it already looks good, hangs well, and works to keep me warm and fashionable so I'm rolling with it.

I've already worn it way more in the past two weeks than I'd worn the sweater version during the previous year.  And it seriously only took 15 minute to make.  How cool is that?!
I did learn the hard way that it takes a lot more finesse if the original sweater is anything other than a straightforward crew or v-neck collar.  I've got one with a cute little Mandarin collar that is still not quite right...

You win some, you lose some.

4 comments:

  1. Appreciate the recommendation. Let me try it out.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow, good for you!! I suppose you had to work fast once you cut into it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was worried it would ravel faster than I could bond it, but you know, it really didn't!

      Delete
  3. Superb, what a weblog it is! This blog provides helpful information to us,
    keep it up.

    ReplyDelete

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