Thursday, September 8, 2011

Hummus

For many years I've had an off again, on again relationship with hummus.  I am not much of a fan of cold savory foods like dips and spreads, but liking hummus always seemed like a vegetarian requirement so I kept trying at it.  I have now (after years of experimentation) found a recipe that turns out how I like it each and every time.  Matt doesn't like to use a recipe for making hummus.  As with the majority of his cooking, he doesn't measure anything and just dumps the ingredients in by eye.  Due to the element of variation in his method sometimes I don't care for how his hummus turns out.  He tends to skimp on the oil whereas I put in an amount which used to make him ask with an incredulous tone "Did you really put 1/3 cup of oil in this?!"  Yes, dear, yes I did.  And that is why it is so awesomely delicious.  He is getting better about it though since he now realizes that low-fat hummus is not popular with the rest of the household (i.e. me).  So, use this a guideline and find what make you happy.  Its a very flexible recipe.  Add roasted red peppers.  Roast the garlic.  Add herbs.  Make it your own.
Hummus
2 C cooked chickpeas
1/3 C olive oil
1/4 C lemon juice (more to taste if you like it tangier)
3 T tahini (or if you have no tahini on hand use peanut butter)
3 cloves crushed garlic
1/4 C water
Large pinch of ground cumin
Salt and pepper, to taste
pinch of paprika

Put all ingredients in food processor and process until smooth and creamy.  Serve at room temperature.

And of course, hummus goes perfect with freshly baked flax seed crackers.

7 comments:

  1. The hummus recipe is largely what I use. Olive oil is good! I don't use the cumin or paprika. In Middle Eastern countries, the hummus is spread in a flat bowl and more olive oil is added to the top and it is often used as a light meal, even breakfast. My anthropologist prof friend married a Jordanian and lived in Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen for extended periods of time. So, my information comes through her experience.

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  2. I am going to try this recipe, as you shared how I have felt over the years...

    by the way, I love roasted chickpeas with red wine vinegar olive oil and sea salt...so it is more in the ingredients.

    I will be more diligent in my preparation this time!!

    Jennifer

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  3. Linda (hey, it's showing up as Linda and not PP now!) - Yes, the oil is what makes or breaks hummus in my opinion. And olive oil is good! Matt is just so frugal. He is trying not to use so much of the jug in one place I think. That is all very interesting about hummus in the Middle East. Learning first hand is the best, but second best is talking to someone who did it all first hand! I am blessed to have several international students who work for me and I have learned so much about Kenyan culture and Swedish culture and Japanese culture. I've not talked to many from the Middle East. What an amazing world!

    Jennifer- I hope you like how it all turns out this time! Another ticket for me is that I really do not really like it served cold. Straight out of the fridge it is no where near as good as at room temp. But, that is just me. Matt gobbles it up out of the fridge. I really enjoy roasted chickpeas, but have only done them a sort of curry style. Your idea sounds simple and tasty. Perfect for my household.

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  4. Whenever I hear of hummus, I think of War of the Worlds with Tom Cruise when he tries it and gags... weird LOL.

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  5. Hummus is yummy! The Farmer's Market by our place has a Hummus vendor, sells the BEST hummus! So many flavors to chose from....mMmmm.

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  6. I did not sign in as PP, too quick on the typing finger in posting. Straight out of the refrigerator is nasty. You are right--room temp. The only way I have made this is using dried Great Northern beans. I cook from scratch on this one. My anthropologist friend did not know I did not use chick peas. She tasted it and approved. When I told her about the switch in beans/peas, she said she could not tell the difference. After all, so much garlic, salt, and lemon juice is going to mask any subtleties in flavor of the beans/peas. Oh, my recipe has lots of salt!

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  7. TLC - I don't think I've seen that, but I could see that it would give you a chuckle. Isn't it funny the associations your brain makes?

    AJK- I could eat roasted garlic hummus with a spoon I bet. Of all the kinds I've tried it is my favorite flavor.

    Linda- We have made hummus using great northerns and white baby limas. I am with you, with all the seasoning the type of bean doesn't matter quite so much. Just a mild, white bean.

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Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts and ideas. I value the advice and friendship that you share with me!