Friday, May 18, 2012

An Unconventional Sandwich Bag

I can't remember the last time I bought ziplock storage bags, but I can remember the last time I used them--you know the ones you wash and use over and over again until they are worn to holes.  But, I am trying to move away from all that disposable and plastic stuff.  The last few ziplocks kicking around my house are quickly dwindling down to none and I've come up with alternatives, such as re-using glass jars.  One of which was this quick little number:
Maybe it wouldn't work in all climates, but a simple tea towel tied with a piece of ribbon kept my PB & J sandwich perfectly until lunchtime when I had the chance to eat it.    I've read sewing projects for making your own sandwich bags, but this seemed, well, much easier.  And I already had all the needed supplies!

I've found that the solutions to our disposable, potentially toxic go-to products are all around if we stop to puzzle it out a bit.  Why not cut down waste and save money at the same time?  And then you also have napkin packed with lunch!

For another idea check out this video demonstration by Max at the Zero Waste Family:  How to Make a Zero Waste Lunch.

7 comments:

  1. BLD,
    I love zero Waste Home because they live what they preach. I am saving a stash of my waterproof coats to use for the outer part of sandwich bags or wraps that I intend to make. That way, even the reusable sandwich bags will be from recycled materials. Unless it is a plain cheese sandwich, I am going to have gooey or drippy sandwich.

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    1. I only eat two kinds of sandwiches: Grilled Cheese and Peanut Butter and Jelly. I am boring I realize. I just don't like sandwiches for some reason. Thus, I'd never considered the drippy aspect.

      ZWH is so fascinating and inspiring for me.

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  2. BLD,
    I have not bought Tupperware in ages. I take care of it and it lasts forever. I feel comfortable using it, but not the other brands or butter or yogurt bowls. Glass jars are inappropriate for children's lunches and are probably not allowed in most schools.

    Did you ever find 1/2 gallon Ball Canning Jars?

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    1. I have two friends who pack glass jars in their children's lunches and its seemed to work out. And Max in the video packs one. So I guess it depends on the kid and the family. Fortunately I don't have to worry about anyone's lunch box, but mine. For mine I slip a bootie sock (you know the mini, iddy-bitty socks that only barely cover your foot) around each of my jars to add as a buffer so it isn't glass on glass and I don't rattle as I walk!

      And I did fine 1/2 gallon jars. There is a GREAT local hardware store down the street from my new house!

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  3. Good idea. Do your colleagues wonder about your financial situation when you ride your bike, walk home, and now bring your sandwich in a towel?

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    1. : ) I bet they do sometimes. But, the director of the library is an eco-nut too so I think that helps make me make more sense.

      I certainly have had conversations with one or two folks (not my colleagues) who think I am much poorer than I am because of the way I live. Little do they know the way I live is exactly why I am NOT poor!

      : )

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  4. so clever! Once you start thinking along these lines, it's amazing how little waste you can generate. I'll remember this. I'm not buying any more plastic bags, but we still have a good supply.

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Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts and ideas. I value the advice and friendship that you share with me!