Monday, August 27, 2012

Garden Updates (in Photos)

Our first strawberry crop coming red.
Peppers going gangbusters.  No complaints from this lady!
A lovely lavender eggplant bloom.
The volunteer mountaineer squash....
....and the biggest mountaineer squash we've ever grown.  Its probably twice as big as those we grew last year.  I guess the volunteer found a good place to spring up!
Looking across the beds from the southeast corner
Looking out from the northeast corner.
Things are coming along well.  We're picking peppers, tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, kale, and herbs right now.  We're drying some sage and just put away our first ever sack on onions.  Its not a huge sack in store, but it is more than we've ever had before.  We just planted a fall crop of spinach and carrots last week so that we can have fresh greens again this fall and, if Matt has anything to say about...which he does, well into winter with the use of hoop houses as well.

8 comments:

  1. It all looks great. That mountain squash looks suspiciously like a low-growing weed in my yard.

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    1. Well, well! That would be a cool "weed" to find growing!!!

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  2. I like the way you've used the supports for the peppers, good idea! Enjoy the produce!

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    1. I think those standard tomato cages are too short and too flimsy for tomatoes, but I find them PERFECT for peppers. We got the colored ones for $.99 each at the discount grocer this summer. It was a good score. It may be just aesthetics, but I think the peppers look happier with a little support!

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  3. Volunteer plants do exceptionally well, don't they! I suspect this may be because they (or maybe the birds?) chose their spot.

    Something we have loved in our garden this year is our nasturtium crop. We grew the Tom Thumb (dwarf) variety because the others are so massive - even the Tom Thumbs get fairly enormous. We had a variety of colours; I like best those I privately call the Van Gogh ones, that have splashes of vivid contrasting colour.
    They are delicious to eat - the liripipe thing (I don't know its botanical name!) is a nectar reservoir, giving a delicious burst of sweetness, and the taste overall is peppery, similar to radishes, fiery but delicate. They really make salads perfect, and so beautiful. And of course they are most easy to grow, and the seeds can be collected and re-sown year after year. x

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    1. I think you are right about the volunteers. They are in exactly the right spot...not just what my eye thinks will be the best!

      I've never grown or eaten nasturtium, but am quite intrigued by flowers that are also food. I have a hard time growing things that aren't in some way edible. But flowers sure are pretty! This could be the best of both. Thanks!

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    2. Oh, and I should add that I love the use of liripipe in botanical explanations!

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    3. I, too, love nasturtiums. Not only are the flowers edible, but so are the leaves. I *love* the leaves in salads in place of lettuce. Yum.

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Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts and ideas. I value the advice and friendship that you share with me!